Archives for category: Beef

When I was seven my family went on vacation to Cairo before going to see relatives in Pakistan.  I guess my parents wanted to enrich our childhood by taking us to see some of the wonders of the world – the pyramids.  Being seven, I didn’t appreciate or understand the greatness of what I was seeing.  I don’t remember much about this trip, but I do remember some highlights.  I’m sure my sister, who was four at the time and I were probably complaining about the heat and continually asking when we would see Mickey Mouse.  My parents were probably kicking themselves for taking their two little brats see these ancient landmarks.

My dad is infamous for telling us stories from our childhood.  Stories we usually would not like every random stranger to know.  Regardless, my dad is always ready to share that he had to carry my crying sister on his back inside the Great Pyramid at Giza and how I complained that the pyramid had a weird smell to it.  As you can see, my sister and I really savored our experience there.  But I do remember bits and pieces of this trip.  We went to the Egyptian Museum, I relished the thought of telling my classmates that I had seen the mummy of King Tut.  We had a guide too, who helped us weave our way through souks and also showed us the famous Tahrir square.  I also recall that we stayed at the Shepheard Hotel, a hotel that my father told me that my grandfather had stayed at during a visit to Cairo.  In that hotel my sister and I feasted on mango ice cream and salade Niçoise.  Out of all the choices of food we had, these two were on our daily wish lists.  At the Shepheard hotel, I recall watching an Egyptian marriage procession in amazement.  I heard ululation for the first time, I did not know whether these high-pitched voices indicated happiness or sadness, whatever the case, I stood there in awe.

Amongst all of these memories, my father always highlights one story in particular.  Looking back, we laugh about the incident, but at the time I still remember my childhood panic.  It was nighttime and after a long day of sightseeing we were back at the hotel.  My sister and I were hungry and requested what we called “Egyptian Pizza,” which was available on the street close to the hotel.  My parents decided to get us some of this Egyptian pizza while they explicitly told my sister and I that they would be back in 5 minutes and we should stay in the room.

A few minutes after they left, I panicked.  I told my sister I was going to look for them.  I went down to the lobby in my nightie and untied Keds sneakers.  Because it doesn’t matter if you’re wearing your Rainbow Brite nightie as long as you’ve got sneakers on – the logic of a child. Anyway, I hustled around the lobby looking for my parents.  I couldn’t find them so I went back up to the room.  My sister was gone.  Apparently, she had also panicked.  I went back down and saw her crying and sitting with an Egyptian man.  He asked us where our parents were and my sister said they left us.  He looked puzzled.  I at seven was slightly more mature and said they were coming back and went to get us pizza.  I don’t remember much else except that within a few minutes my parents arrived and saw us in the lobby with the man and my sister full of tears.  They must have realized that they shouldn’t have left us alone.  This is a story that is repeated practically every time I go to see my parents.

All that commotion was for this flatbread.  I think you can find this in Levant cuisine as well as Turkish cuisine known as Lahmajoun and Lahmacun.  I suspect this Egyptian version might have been Armenian because of the large Armenian population in Egypt.  I recreated it here, with a different crust.  I love adding flax and chia seeds to my dough.  They had a lovely nuttiness and texture as well.  The spicy and smokey ground meat is delicious and the bell peppers minced in shine through.  I made this and was reminded of that trip to Cairo.  I guess my parents did the right thing by taking us to Egypt.  If anything, I have this story to tell.

Spicy Beef Flatbreads

makes 4

Ingredients

for the whole-wheat, flax, chia dough:

1 1/4 teaspoon dry active yeast (or half a sachet)

2 teaspoons sugar

1/2 cup warm water

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon champagne vinegar

3/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for rolling

3/4 whole-wheat four

1/4 cup ground flax seeds

2 tablespoons ground chia seeds

1/2 teaspoon salt

for the beef:

1/2 lb ground beef (you can also mix ground beef and ground lamb, or just use lamb)

1/2 an onion, chopped

5-6 mini bell peppers, red, orange, yellow, or 1 large bell pepper, chopped

3 cloves garlic, chopped

1 green chili, chopped (seeds removed, if you like)

1/2 cup chopped parsley, mint, and cilantro

2 scallions, chopped

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/2 teaspoon, red chili flakes, use less for less spicy

1 teaspoon ground cumin

kosher salt, to taste

olive oil

fresh parsley, mint, labneh, olive oil, olives, and fresh lemon wedges, for serving

Method

First, make the dough by combining the yeast, sugar, and water in the bowl of an electric mixer.  Let the yeast bloom for 10 minutes.  Next, add in the olive oil, champagne vinegar, and salt.  Combine the dry ingredients in a separate bowl.  Attach the dough hook to the mixer and put the bowl on the mixer and turn it to low-speed.  Gradually add the dry ingredients into the bowl, once the dry ingredients are all in the bowl, turn the speed to medium and let the dough knead for 2-3 minutes.  If you need extra water or flour, add it tablespoon at a time.  It should be a smooth dough.  Once kneaded, drizzle some olive oil over top so that it doesn’t form a skin and leave the dough to rise in a warm place for 1-2 hours.

Once the dough has risen punch it down and knead slightly and put it back in the bowl for the second rising, about 30 minutes.  Once the dough has risen again knead it for a few minutes and separate it into four balls.

Next, in a food processor, add in the onions, garlic, peppers, green chili pepper, and herbs.  Pulse a few times until finely chopped.  Next, squeeze out the excess water from the vegetable mixture in a kitchen towel or strong paper towel.  In bowl, combine the vegetable mixture with the ground meat and spices.  Mix it together with your hands.  Set aside

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Next, roll out the dough to 8-9 inch diameter circles, like individual sized pizzas.  dust with flour to prevent the dough from sticking.  Drizzle the dough circles with olive oil. Place the dough on a flat baking tray and then spread the meat mixture over the dough evenly and drizzle with olive oil again.  Bake for 10-15 minutes until the dough is golden brown.  Serve with fresh parsley, mint, labneh, olive oil, olives, and fresh lemon wedges.

This is definitely not a Valentine’s Day dish.  It’s not special and it’s completely and utterly pedestrian, at least in Pakistani households.  Regardless, I wanted to share it with you today because it’s the first dish I ever cooked for my husband.  Way back when, five years ago, in April, I met my husband through my sister.  She met him and put him in touch with me, he was in grad school in Toronto and I was in grad school in Montreal and in my sister’s mind that was enough reason for us to get along.  We started talking and then one day on a whim he decided to visit me in Montreal.  As you can imagine, I was nervous.  In our conversations I told him I enjoyed cooking, though at the time I didn’t do much being a busy grad student.  So when he arrived and when we got over the initial awkwardness we both went grocery shopping together.

It’s not exactly the first date most of us imagine, but that is what happened with us.  The premise of the grocery shopping was that I would cook lunch for us.  I had no clue what to make, we were wandering through the aisles and I said that I would make keema (ground beef).  It was a dish I was comfortable making and my now husband was pretty laid back about the whole thing.  He told me he liked it with green bell peppers, in my mind I thought, “ew,” but I put some green bell peppers into our cart and also picked up some spinach to  make aloo palak, a dish I had never made before.  Back then, I was polite and didn’t say anything about the bell peppers, if it was today, it would be an entirely different story.

We got back to my apartment and I started cooking in my tiny kitchen with very little proper kitchen equipment.  We began talking and pretty soon we were more comfortable and it felt as though we knew each other for ages.  I made the keema, aloo palak (it turned out good), basmati rice, salad, and chutney.  My husband stuck with me after that meal and it’s safe to say he was a fan of my cooking.  After eating lunch we explored Montreal, which in of itself is a very romantic city, and then later had some late night bites at a restaurant, a “proper” date, if you will.

My husband’s favorite Pakistani dish besides channay is keema. I don’t know if he liked it before or if his love for it blossomed after I made it that first time.  He now requests it on a weekly basis.  He was just away for three weeks on medical residency interviews and whenever he would get a few days in the middle to come home, he would ask me to make aloo keema. Luckily for me it’s an easy dish and I also enjoy it.

I know this isn’t a gorgeous Valentine’s dessert of gooey chocolate, but it is one of “our” dishes.  Since my husband and I consider food a big part of what we have in common, it doesn’t matter if it’s simple Pakistani home cooking or some form of haute cuisine, we always enjoy it in each other’s company.  Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone!

Aloo Keema

serves 3 as a main, 4 if served with a side dish

Ingredients

Canola oil, or any neutral vegetable oil

1 pound ground beef (chicken, lamb, goat) It’s also up to you if you want to use lean or not.  I like to wash and drain it in a colander.

1 red onion, thinly sliced into half moons

2 heaping tablespoons ginger-garlic paste (2 inch piece of ginger and 5-6 cloves of garlic blended together with a little water)

1 potato, peeled and cut into large chunks (you can also use peas, peppers, cauliflower, or any vegetable you choose, just adjust cooking times)

2 tomatoes, puréed (canned are alright, if they are out of season)

1 teaspoon roasted cumin powder

1 teaspoon coriander powder

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon red chili powder/cayenne pepper, or to taste

1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

3-4 whole black peppercorns

2 cloves

2-3 green chilies, julienned, seeds removed if you like

nice handful of cilantro, chopped

3 scallions, chopped, optional

garam masala, optional

limes, for garnish, optional

Method

Heat a large saucepan on medium heat and add in some oil, to your taste.  Let the oil heat up and add the onions and fry them for a few minutes until they start to almost turn light golden brown.

Add in the meat and ginger-garlic paste and keep stirring it until the ground beef is all broken up and in very small pieces.  Once the meat is slightly browned add in all the spices except the garam masala and keep mixing until everything is combined and the rawness is cooked out the spices.

Next, add in the tomato purée and mix it into the meat.  I also add in half a cup of water at this point.  Lower the heat to medium low and cover the pan and allow it to cook for 15 minutes or so.

After fifteen minutes, check the meat and mix it.  Cover and let it cook for fifteen more minutes.  After fifteen minutes, add in the potatoes and mix everything together a few times.  You should no longer see individual pieces of onion (it should have melted into the “masala,” and the oil should start to separate from the meat.  If necessary, add a little water (1/4 cup) to help the potatoes cook.

Once the potatoes are cooked, add in the green chilies, cilantro, scallions, and a sprinkling of garam masala and cook for another few minutes.  Serve with rice, chapati/roti, or naan and green chutney, limes, spicy pickles (achaar), and salad.

*Leftovers taste even better!

You all might be getting sick of my husband stories.  I know, believe me, we do not need to know about every couple’s every move.  But, I try not to be so PDA (public display of affection) style.  So, maybe you guys don’t mind.

Regardless of all this, I had to make something for my husband’s birthday.  Out of the four years we have been together, two of them married, I have never cooked for him on his birthday.  We opt for going out.  When, I first met my husband, in the early stages, I made lofty promises that I would make my husband this and that, including a rack of lamb (forget about it), an all-American burger (done!) and other things I can’t even bother to remember.

On this birthday, I was stumped, I even considered making the rack of lamb, but the butcher only had one sorry-looking rack left.  Thus, I was saved from that task.  My husband is a carnivore, so I knew red meat would have to be an option.  I love ribeye steaks, so juicy, tender, and flavorful.  I picked some up and went on from there.

At the farmer’s market, I saw garlic scapes, for the first time in person.  They almost reminded me of coiled parrot-green snakes, smooth and bright.  I have been intrigued by them for a few years and really wanted to use the garlic scapes in a dish.  The vendor told me they are great grilled or in a pesto.  I bought them and brought them home, and decided to try and make a salsa out of them.  Mind you, I was taking a risk on my husband’s birthday dinner and it may have well all failed and we would be going out for his birthday.  Thankfully, the salsa came together nicely.  Pungent, herbacious and ready to take on the bold flavors of the steak.

All that was left was the the corn salad.  It was so simple and fresh.  As a last-minute addition I decided to toss in some toasted pumpkin seeds.  The crunch, texture, and most of all the salty goodness really elevated the salad.  I was proud of myself for coming up with this meal for my husband’s birthday.  I thoroughly enjoyed the whole process and loved actually plating the dish in restaurant style.  For me, it’s all about the colors and this dish delivered vibrancy.  Most of all my husband loved it.

Ribeye Steaks with a Garlic Scape Salsa Verde and an Avocado, Corn, Tomato Salad

Serves 2 big eaters

for the Salsa Verde:

Ingredients

10-15 garlic scapes

1/2 a bunch cilantro

1 cup packed basil leaves

2 jalapeno peppers, seeded if you wish

juice of one juicy lime

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

1 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

water to loosen it up, if necessary

Method

On a grill pan or sauté pan, cook the garlic scapes on medium heat for about 15 minutes, or until they are lightly charred.  Add all the herbs including the garlic scapes into a blender or food processor.  Begin to pulse a few times, toss in the jalapenos, lime juice, salt, and pepper.  Run your blender or food processor until everything is finely chopped, next stream in the extra virgin olive oil until everything is uniform and combined.  If the mixture is too thick, loosen it up with some water.  If you want to be extra perfect run the sauce through a sieve, I didn’t do this.  Before serving, lightly warm the salsa verde in a saucepan.

for the Avocado, Corn, and Tomato Salad:

Ingredients

1 cup fresh corn

1/2 cup cherry tomatoes,halved

1 avocado, in chunks

juice of one lime

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

a few sprigs of cilantro, chives, and garlic scapes, chopped

2 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds

1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

Method

Mix together all the ingredients—so simple!

for the Steaks:

Ingredients

2- 1 pound ribeye steaks, at room temperature, I used boneless

generous amounts of salt and black pepper)

drizzle of extra virgin olive oil

Method

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Season the steaks with the salt and pepper on both sides and drizzle with a little olive oil.  Heat a large oven-safe sauté pan on the stove (medium heat).  Place the steaks in the hot pan on the stove and do not touch them for about 5 minutes.  Flip them over and cook for one minute on the stove top and transfer the pan to oven for 4-5 more minutes for medium rare.  Remove them from the oven and let them rest for 10-15 minutes.

to assemble the plate:

Spoon the salsa verde on the bottom of a plate, as much as you like, I used about 1/2 a cup per plate.  Place the rested steak on top, if you wish you can slice it against the grain on an angle and arrange it over top, I chose to leave it whole.  Place some of the corn salad on top on the steak and sprinkle a few toasted pumpkin seeds around the plate.

*No birthday is complete without a cake.  So, I also made him his favorite vanilla bean cheesecake, which I will put up soon.

There are just some foods you always use.  If I am eating a sandwich, 9 times out of 10 it has arugula in it.  I do not usually buy steaks, but this day I was feeling it.  I mean I love red meat, juicy, tender, and flavorful, but I am not that confident cooking it at home.  Therefore, it is usually reserved for restaurants.  This should change.  After making this steak sandwich I realized it is not hard at all.  Yes, this should be reserved for an occasional splurge, but I had to share it for the times you are feeling carnivorous.  (Sorry, vegetarians and vegans).  Yes, you can substitute chicken or eggplant, or tofu, but in this case I choose not to!  Yes, that was a little mean.  I promise, I am not mean.  All in good fun!

I used strip loin steak, which served its purpose well here.  I smothered it with a chipotle, feta, herb, and roasted garlic dip.  I realized this is a signature move of mine: making a dip full of herbs in my mini food processor.  I swear, it is so easy and so yum!  Plus, the combinations are endless.  I must say, I love making dips.  I am a mad woman with my food processor.  Honestly, I do not know what i would do without it.

I should stop gushing about my food processor, you might get the wrong idea.  This post is supposed to be about my steak sandwich!  I caramelized onions (another “habit” of mine) with yellow peppers, jalapenos, and mushrooms.  This steak sandwich does have a few identity issues.  Does it want to be Southwest, Philly, Mediterranean style?  Does it really matter?  I do not think so.  All the combinations taste good together and that is what is important to me.

Also, be warned, this sandwich is messy!  I love to eat messy.  It is more fun.  There is a time and place is be civilized and dainty, but not when it comes to a steak sandwich.  I will leave the proper decorum to the finger sandwich and scone crowd.

New York Strip and Caramelized Onion, Mushrooms, Peppers and a Chipotle Feta Dip Sandwiches (what a mouthful!)

makes 3 Sandwiches

Ingredients

extra virgin olive oil

1 pound Strip Loin Steak

kosher salt

freshly ground black pepper

1/2 a red onion, sliced thinly

3 sprigs of thyme

handful of cilantro leaves

1/2 a bell pepper, sliced (any color you prefer)

1 jalapenos pepper, seeded and julienned

10 mushroom caps, kept whole (any variety you like)

fresh baby arugula leaves

1 avocado, sliced

1 multigrain baguette

For the dip

1/2 cup reduced-fat sour cream

2 tablespoons lite mayo

1-2 chipotle peppers (1 for medium spicy, 2 for extra hot)

10 sprigs of chives, roughly chopped

1/2 cup parsley, roughly chopped

1/2 cup cilantro, roughly chopped

5 cloves of roasted garlic (Take the cloves of garlic, add salt, pepper olive oil, wrap them in foil and bake at 350 degrees for 30-45 minutes, or until they are soft and spreadable like butter)

1/4 cup feta cheese

juice of half a lime

dash of extra virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon honey

kosher salt, to taste

freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.  Heat an oven safe pan on medium heat.  Add a little olive oil to the pan.  Season the steak generously with salt and black pepper.  Sear  the steak for about 2 minutes per side.  Transfer the pan to the oven for 8 minutes for medium-rare.  Remove from the oven and allow to rest for 10-15 minutes.  After resting slice on a bias against the grain.

In a pan on medium-low heat sauté the onions with the thyme for about 10 minutes until they begin to caramelize.  Add in the mushrooms and cook for 5 more minutes.  Season with salt and pepper.  Add in the bell peppers and some cilantro and allow the peppers to soften, about 2-3 minutes.  Set aside.

For the dip, in a mini food processor add all the ingredients and pulse until combined.

To assemble the sandwiches, spread the dip on the baguette, lay the steak, avocado, caramelized onions, peppers, mushrooms, top off with the baby arugula and dig in!

December is here and the cold has arrived!  Today I kept my earmuffs with me just in case the walk home would yield frostbite :).  No, I wasn’t going to wear them, but just in case :).  I’ve been thinking about making some chili for a few days now but today it felt right.  I needed the warmth and the comfort it brings.

I know when some people think of chili they think of Wendy’s 99 cent menu or some tailgating party.  But, I find it to be more nourishing and satisfying and actually quite healthy.  I mean, unless you use fatty meat and pile on the oil, I think chili could be considered a health food.  It’s full of protein and you can doctor it up any way you wish.  Use lean ground beef, or ground turkey/chicken, keep it vegetarian, or even vegan.

The chili I make is not a traditional chili con carne made famous by chili cook-offs and the like.  Mine is just my own take on a somewhat iconic American dish.  I love that there’s no hard and fast rule to chili and that’s the way all cooking should be.  If you like it add it, if you don’t leave it out.  There are no precise measurements here, don’t fret if you add 1 teaspoon more of cumin, don’t worry everything will be alright.  Even if you think you can’t cook, you CAN cook chili,  even without the “XYZ chili seasoning packet.”

Chili

Serves 4-5

Ingredients

1 onion, roughly chopped

6-7 cloves garlic, minced

1-2 jalapeno peppers, chopped (seeds removed if you like)

4 sprigs of thyme

1 pound lean ground beef

1 cup black beans

1 can kidney beans

1 chipotle pepper with the adobo sauce

2-3 tablespoons tomato paste

1 28 ounce can whole tomatoes chopped finely or crushed/diced tomatoes

2 heaping tablespoons chili powder

1 teaspoon ancho chili powder

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 cup chicken or vegetable stock if the chili gets too thick

Handful of chopped cilantro

2 tablespoons olive oil

Method

Heat a large pot to medium heat and add the oil, sweat the onions for about 5 minutes.  Turn down the heat to medium-low and add in the jalapenos, garlic, and thyme and allow to cook for about 10 more minutes or until the onions or almost light brown.  Add in the meat and all of the spices and use a spoon to break up the meat so it can distribute evenly and be smooth.  Stir for a minute or two and add in the tomato paste and chipotle peppers and combine them with the meat.  Add the beans and the large can of tomatoes.  Mix everything together and allow to simmer on medium-low for about an hour.  Check occasionally, if it gets too thick add the chicken or vegetable stock.  The consistency should be like a stew.  At about 45 minutes throw in the handful of cilantro and continue to simmer for 15 minutes.  Before serving remove the thyme stems.

Garnish options:

red onions, cilantro, scallions, jalapenos, limes, avocado, sour cream, creme fraiche, cheese (monterey jack, cheddar, cojita, or anything you like), tabasco, salsa, and the list could go on.

I’m all about the garnish!  Don’t feed me chili without garnishes or I will be throughly disappointed!

IMG_7973Even though I looooveeeeeee cooking, there are times I have no idea what to make.  Or more accurately, I don’t feel like making anything!  I beg and plead with my husband to make me something because I know if he HAD to he could make a decent meal.  He knows all my cooking secrets and what ingredients pair well together but he just pretends he has no clue.  So on this night, when I had no idea what to make, I asked him my daily question, “What do you want for dinner?”  Usually, he says, “anything” but on this day, glory be to God who helped me out, he said a roast of beef.  Of course, I don’t have a beef roast on hand so obviously we have to go out and get one (after a stop to the video rental store of course to get some movie like Reservoir Dogs or something I am totally not interested in).

IMG_7940Once we reached the butcher, being a small city he didn’t have the beef tenderloin roast I was imagining in my head.  But, an option of eye of round or prime rib.  Though prime rib is YUM, I would like to save it for special occasions due to its fat content.  I got the eye of round.  I came home having no idea of what sort of cut it was, though the butcher said it was very tender and to cook it at a high temperature then turn it down for the remainder of the cooking time.  I looked it up and it said it was a popular cut in the 1950′s.  I thought to myself, “great, it’s like the food on the show Mad Men, an era when eating Ceasar Salad was exotic.”  Anyhow, I ignored that and cook it as though it were a tenderloin.  Giving the roast a bit of an ego boost if you will.  I used my guru/mentor/idol’s (Ina Garten) style for making a filet roast.  A link to her Filet of Beef recipe is here.

The preparation is so simple, that I know my husband could have done it just as well as me.  No chopping (other than the potatoes), no slaving over the stove (just throw everything in the oven and forget about it)!  The meat was tender and juicy.  The perfect solution for a day where you don’t feel like cooking.  Unless, you go out to eat or  get takeout…..YUM!

*The 2 pound roast was reasonablly priced as well.  My original tenderloin idea would have put a dent in our wallets.  Hehe  :)

Roast Eye of Round with Roasted Potatoes with a Pan Gravy

loosely inspired by Ina Garten

Serves 3

Ingredients

Eye of Round Roast

2 pound eye of round roast (ours was tied by the butcher with butcher’s twine)

1 whole bulb on garlic, peeled

1 1/2 teaspoons of kosher salt, or to taste

1 1/2 teaspoons of ground black pepper, or to tasteIMG_7977

5-6 sprigs of thyme

3-4 Yukon gold potatoes in wedges

drizzle of olive oil

Preheat your oven to 500 degrees.  Take a baking dish or sheet pan place the beef in the center cover with salt and pepper, leaving a little to put over the potatoes as well.  Throw in the peeled garlic cloves.  I poked holes in the meat and stuffed the holes with some whole cloves, but this is entirely optional.  Put the potatoes in the dish, season them with some salt, pepper, and some thyme.  Cover the beef with the thyme.  Drizzle the whole dish with olive oil.  Place in roast in the oven for 20 minutes at 500 degreees.  After 20 minutes turn it down to 300 for about 30 minutes.  After 30 minutes turn the oven off and let the roast sit for 10-15 more minutes.  Take the roast out of the oven after 10-15 minutes and let it rest for about 15 minutes.  Slice and serve.  (This cooking time is for medium rare bordering medium).

*This roast tasted great the next day in sandwiches.

To make the gravy, take out any drippings from the beef baking dish.  Put them in a small saucepan add about a tablespoon of flour.  Whisk in the flour until it dissolves.  I also added the leftover thyme sprigs into he gravy.  Add 3/4 cup of chicken of beef stock and allow the gravy to thicken on medium heat for about 5-7 minutes. If you wish, you may add a dab of butter at the end to make the sauce glisten.  Serve over the beef.

I also served a tomato, red onion, avocado salad on the side.  IMG_7964

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